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Saturday, May 31, 2008

Broadening Our Horizons

You cannot speak of ocean to a well-frog, -- the creature of a narrow sphere. You cannot speak of ice to a summer insect, -- the creature of a season.

- Zhuang Zhu, quoted in   Larry A. Samovar & Richard E. Porter, Communication Between Cultures (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1995), 25.

Francesca and Igorots

Is he an igorot, thats why he doesnt understand the importance of paper works and time?!!!

....I started to guess, baka nga Igorot eto? I dont have any goat or hen to pay him, if he doesnt want money haha.

These misguided, unnecessary lines were posted by a Filipina in France named Francesca who is married to a Frenchman. As can be expected, she got a telling off from other Filipinos and even non-Filipinos for such an ethnic slur on Igorots (see all comments here). I first got to know of this while going over some posts in a fellow Igorot's blogsite.


I say the responses she got for her posts should be enough to teach her a lesson on human relations and communication. I hope that in her future posts, she will be more prudent in her use of language to vent out her sentiments.


On the other hand, the rest of us have valuable lessons to learn from this as well. For one, another person's error reminds us of our own imperfections and of the need for us to be open to chastisement and correction. And in blogosphere, a person who is not willing to put away her/his blinders or the log in his/her eye is not fit to put up a blog.


Two, you can circle the globe without ever widening your circle of sensibility. Travel is supposed to broaden our perspective on the various facets of life like cultural diversity. But it can only have such an effect on us if we let our minds transcend the physical limits of our cranial capacity.


Finally, when the fires of prejudice threaten our sense of community, it is not our ability to create and throw torches that counts, but our ability to quickly douse the flames that does.


Related Posts:


Francesca & Igorots (II)


Re: Call Centers and Racism


Call Centers and Racism


The Gallant Igorots of Bataan


1st International Conference on Cordillera Studies


A Columnist's Woes


***


Some of you may be laughing heartily after reading through all the responses to Francesca's posts. Let's add to the fun by learning a few French words the Filipino way (got this from a forwarded message ages ago):




  • Alms -LE MOUSSE

  • Bald -CAL VOU

  • Band -COM VOU

  • Behind - LE COULD

  • Caught in the Act - NA VOU COU

  • City -CE VOU

  • Confused - LE TOU

  • Did not take a bath - LE BAG

  • Disappear - LE PAD

  • Drugs -SHA VOU

  • Five - LE MA

  • Feathers -VA LA E VOU

  • Goodbye -VA VOU

  • Liter - LE TRUE

  • Sink -LA VA VOU

  • Turn - LE COUP

  • Unclear -MA LA VOU


Good day, kayet!







Friday, May 30, 2008

Those Isolated Tribes

The initial documentation of an isolated Brazilian tribe's existence (articles and photos @ survival-international & dailymail) has electrified the world as had other news in the past about the rest of the 100+ surviving "uncontacted" tribes.


As an Indigenous Person (IP) myself, I have followed the developments of this report with great interest but with mixed feelings. I don't know whether to rejoice or grieve for this find, for I don't know where it will lead us or them.


As I think of this newly discovered tribe, I am reminded of the story of Ishi, the last of the Yahi tribe of Northern California, and of "Nell," the girl raised by her aphasic mother in an isolated cabin somewhere in the boondocks of North Carolina who was eventually discovered by outsiders. Just like that of Ishi and Nell, will this South American tribe's fate be caught in the tug-of-war between those who view them as laboratory specimens or museum articles and those who regard them with a sense of kinship and with deep respect for their pristine conditions? Will the story of this indigenous group have a tragic ending just like that of Ishi and his tribe, or will it have a happy ending just like that of Nell?


Should they be left alone? I doubt that they will be left alone. That question is just the same as asking somebody who had just uncovered a treasure hoard in the heart of a jungle "to leave the thing alone." Will the insatiable appetite of the media for the strange and spectacular leave them alone? Will the ichthyologists, botanists and other biologists leave their flora and fauna alone? Will the ethnolinguists, anthropologists, and other scholars leave their culture alone? Will prospectors of all sorts leave their natural resources alone? Will those imbued with their contemporary version of "manifest destiny" leave the "sorry state" of these "half-devil(s) and half-child(ren)" alone? Will the rest of us who are titillated by the primitive, outworldly or the exotic leave them alone?



To leave them alone or not? -- That is not the question.

To let them live with their own sense of dignity or not? -- That is the question.



Thursday, May 29, 2008

Camilo Lammawin, Sr.

[Note: This is part of my continuing project to make available to the public historical documents about Kalinga written by the late Kalinga journalist, Augustus “Gus” Ulat Saboy (AUS).  One of Lammawin’s sons,Milnar was a Judge who was once groomed to run for Congress but was unfortunately murdered.  Milnar’s younger brother,   Camilo Jr., served as the first city mayor of Tabuk  sms]

Camilo Lammawin, 59, 
K-A Congressional Candidate Killed
By Augustus Ulát Sabóy (ca. 1969)

Former Kalinga Deputy Governor Camilo Lammawin, one of Kalinga’s established leaders was killed in a vehicular accident in Pinukpuk last Sunday night, according to sketchy reports received in Baguio City last Tuesday. He was 59 years old.

Lammawin was one of the 12 candidates for Congress in the lone district of Kalinga-Apayao. He was running as an Independent candidate.

Born on February 24, 1910 at Magnao, Tabuk, Kalinga-Apayao, Lammawin was among the few Kalinga natives encouraged to go to school because of his promising brilliance in grade school.  After his elementary education, he was sent to the University of the Philippines High School in Manila where he graduated in 1932.  Subsequently, he enrolled at the Far Eastern University for his associate in arts course which he completed in 1936.

While pursuing his college course, the late Assemblyman Saturnino Moldero discovered the talents of the young Camilo and later tapped him as his secretary in the Philippine Assembly.  After Moldero’s term, he engaged in business, mainly in mining during the “gold boom” and at the same time assisted government officials in charting plans for the opening of the once wild “Laya Valley,” now Tabuk, the rice granary of the Mountain Provinces.

During the war, he served with the USASFIP, NL as a soldier assigned with the 11th Infantry which fought in the Cagayan Valley and Eastern Mountain Province campaigns.

After the war, he served first as a military deputy governor for Kalinga and later as secretary of the Provincial Board of the Mountain Province from 1946-1947.

He was again appointed as deputy governor of Kalinga until he was requested by the late Congressman Juan M. Duyan to serve as his secretary in Congress.

When Duyan was elected provincial governor in 1967, Lammawin was appointed as provincial secretary until last March 15, 1969 when he resigned to accept the position of Philamlife Insurance supervisor for the province of Kalinga-Apayao.

After unsuccessfully entering the Kalinga leaders convention last August 27 which was held in Balbalan, he was urged by Kalinga leaders to run for Congress. He filed his certificate of candidacy in Manila on September 10, 1969 as an Independent Nacionalista.

Reports received from Tabuk said that he was on his campaign tour to Pinukpuk when he met his accident.  Six other companions in the vehicle they were riding were injured, the same report said.

Lammawin is survived by his wife, the former Narcisa Tolentino of Baguio City; children Milnar (16),  Evita (15), Fe (12), Camilo Jr. (10), and Florence (8); and his brothers, former Board Member Castro Lammawin and Orlindo, a public school teacher.

Balbalan: Land of Waterfalls

Balbalan: Land of Waterfalls
by Augustus Ulat Saboy, ca. 1966

[Note: Although commercialism has, in the past few decades, crept into the hinterlands of Balbalan and has scarred their pristine beauty in many areas, the municipality remains alluring. Several waterfalls still cascade down mountainsides to join the great Saltan River and the underground river Gus Saboy speaks of still rumbles below a section of the rugged roads of Balbalan. Deer and wild boars, however, are now on the brink of extinction. - sms]

BALBALAN – A wanderlust may find himself fully satiated with historic sights and scenic wonders in this municipality if he makes it a point to visit all the natural wonders of this western Kalinga municipality.

Of course, he must be physically fit, first of all – with a strong back to meet the bumps of a buggy ride through Balbalan’s rugged road and a good pair of legs to climb hillsides into the barrios and sitios, criss-crossed by horse and foot trails.

From the municipality of Lubuagan, the capital town of the sub-province of Kalinga, one is greeted by the sight of Limo-falls, a 60-foot waterfall in the sitio of Salagpat, Balinciagao. This is the second known highest waterfall in this municipality, and perhaps in the province. It cascades down a high cliff overlooking the Pasil River below and the villages of Balinciagao barrio.

Along the road up to the old municipality center of this municipality bearing its name are other waterfalls gliding down thickly wooded hillsides. As one travels westward through the barrio of Balbalan, he finds himself swallowed by thick forests through which the Kalinga-Abra national highway is carved out from the rocky mountainsides. Here in this jungle section of the road is found a natural tunnel formed by a huge rock whose caves rest on another big rock, thus forming a short tunnel.

Beyond this tunnel and towards the barrio of Salegseg, the present municipal center of the Balbalan is the famous Ugid underground river. A short stopover on this spot gives a traveler an opportunity to hear the droning sound of the river below, as if a propeller-driven airplane is left with engines running. It is said that this subterranean river is teeming with black fresh water eels of varying sizes. Thomas Awing, a public school teacher and among the few natives of the place who have toured this underground river, said that during the dry months of the year, natives of the place visit the river by passing through big rock cleavages on the surface near the road. In some sections of the river, torches are needed because of the darkness. It is in these sections of the underground river that fresh water eels are found, Awing says.

The public school teacher also reveled that in his own barrio of Poswoy, which is some two-hour hike from the national road, another breath-taking sight can be had from what is believed as the highest waterfall in Kalinga – the Ligayan falls. During rainy seasons, the waterfall sends down a giant silver veil of water from the mountain above. As the falling water hits the Saltan River hundreds of feet below, it sends sprays of water formed like huge flower petals. Other waterfalls, according to Awing in Dao-angan and Poswoy – all in this municipality – are Pudao and Maulilog falls which he said are equally “beautiful” in sights.

Salegseg, the site of the municipal hall, has also its contribution to scenic wonders in this region in the form of the Makelkelang mountains whose huge rock face appears like the world-famed Rock of Gibraltar in Span along the Morrocco Strait. Legends have it that Kabunian, the legendary Kalinga superbeing, once roamed this mountain. White stripes formed on the face of a rock below the mountain is said to be the stains” of the “vomit of Kabunian” when he was food-poisoned by the old villagers of the place.

Westward towards the Abra-Kalinga provincial boundary, the barrio of Pantikian greets you with another huge waterfall called the Giso-od falls. The falls which is hemmed in my perpendicular cliffs on its sides is famous for its legend as “suicide-fall” for spurned lovers. Other waterfalls seen along the road now under construction leading to the province of Abra on the west are the Bagawat falls and the Agta falls, the latter yielding a romantic sight with its “gold” water apparently caused by the rusty color of the rock through which the water flows.

In the westernmost barrio of Balbalasang, more waterfalls greet the sightseer. The Mapatag falls near the barrio may be likened to the “Bridal Veil” falls of Kennon road in the municipality of Tuba. Within the barrio is the Toy-ob falls around which are found natural swimming pools where the weary traveler can take a dip into its fresh, clear and cool waters.

Perhaps the only pure-brick building the Mountain Province is found in this border barrio. This is the Balbalasang Elementary School building, erected some 30 years ago. The bricks used in putting up the school were baked from crude implements by the early pupils as well as the parents of the schoolchildren. Today, this school building stands as one of the historical landmarks of the Mountain Province – a living symbol of civilization in this part of the country and a living tribute to the dedication of early settlers of this barrio to their dreams of enlightening their sons and daughters through the blessings of education.

This is Balbalan – the land of cascading waterfalls and a promising timber as well as mining municipality.

Hunting any species of deer starts from January to May 15 every year. This was embodied in the parks and wildlife regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
According to the regulations, a licensed hunter could hunt any species of deer during the season. The law, however, prohibits the hunting of female deer any time of the year. Two male deer are the catch limit (bag limit) allowed by law for any licensed hunter. Wild carabao could also be hunted during the same season but the bag limit is limited to only one male of this animal.

Sports hunters could get their permit from the Parks and Wildlife Office at Binondo, Manila.

Balbalan: Land of Waterfalls

Balbalan: Land of Waterfalls
by Augustus Ulat Saboy, ca. 1966

[Note: Although commercialism has, in the past few decades, crept into the hinterlands of Balbalan and has scarred their pristine beauty in many areas, the municipality remains alluring. Several waterfalls still cascade down mountainsides to join the great Saltan River and the underground river Gus Saboy speaks of still rumbles below a section of the rugged roads of Balbalan. Deer and wild boars, however, are now on the brink of extinction. - sms]

BALBALAN – A wanderlust may find himself fully satiated with historic sights and scenic wonders in this municipality if he makes it a point to visit all the natural wonders of this western Kalinga municipality.

Of course, he must be physically fit, first of all – with a strong back to meet the bumps of a buggy ride through Balbalan’s rugged road and a good pair of legs to climb hillsides into the barrios and sitios, criss-crossed by horse and foot trails.

From the municipality of Lubuagan, the capital town of the sub-province of Kalinga, one is greeted by the sight of Limo-falls, a 60-foot waterfall in the sitio of Salagpat, Balinciagao. This is the second known highest waterfall in this municipality, and perhaps in the province. It cascades down a high cliff overlooking the Pasil River below and the villages of Balinciagao barrio.

Along the road up to the old municipality center of this municipality bearing its name are other waterfalls gliding down thickly wooded hillsides. As one travels westward through the barrio of Balbalan, he finds himself swallowed by thick forests through which the Kalinga-Abra national highway is carved out from the rocky mountainsides. Here in this jungle section of the road is found a natural tunnel formed by a huge rock whose caves rest on another big rock, thus forming a short tunnel.

Beyond this tunnel and towards the barrio of Salegseg, the present municipal center of the Balbalan is the famous Ugid underground river. A short stopover on this spot gives a traveler an opportunity to hear the droning sound of the river below, as if a propeller-driven airplane is left with engines running. It is said that this subterranean river is teeming with black fresh water eels of varying sizes. Thomas Awing, a public school teacher and among the few natives of the place who have toured this underground river, said that during the dry months of the year, natives of the place visit the river by passing through big rock cleavages on the surface near the road. In some sections of the river, torches are needed because of the darkness. It is in these sections of the underground river that fresh water eels are found, Awing says.

The public school teacher also reveled that in his own barrio of Poswoy, which is some two-hour hike from the national road, another breath-taking sight can be had from what is believed as the highest waterfall in Kalinga – the Ligayan falls. During rainy seasons, the waterfall sends down a giant silver veil of water from the mountain above. As the falling water hits the Saltan River hundreds of feet below, it sends sprays of water formed like huge flower petals. Other waterfalls, according to Awing in Dao-angan and Poswoy – all in this municipality – are Pudao and Maulilog falls which he said are equally “beautiful” in sights.

Salegseg, the site of the municipal hall, has also its contribution to scenic wonders in this region in the form of the Makelkelang mountains whose huge rock face appears like the world-famed Rock of Gibraltar in Span along the Morrocco Strait. Legends have it that Kabunian, the legendary Kalinga superbeing, once roamed this mountain. White stripes formed on the face of a rock below the mountain is said to be the stains” of the “vomit of Kabunian” when he was food-poisoned by the old villagers of the place.

Westward towards the Abra-Kalinga provincial boundary, the barrio of Pantikian greets you with another huge waterfall called the Giso-od falls. The falls which is hemmed in my perpendicular cliffs on its sides is famous for its legend as “suicide-fall” for spurned lovers. Other waterfalls seen along the road now under construction leading to the province of Abra on the west are the Bagawat falls and the Agta falls, the latter yielding a romantic sight with its “gold” water apparently caused by the rusty color of the rock through which the water flows.

In the westernmost barrio of Balbalasang, more waterfalls greet the sightseer. The Mapatag falls near the barrio may be likened to the “Bridal Veil” falls of Kennon road in the municipality of Tuba. Within the barrio is the Toy-ob falls around which are found natural swimming pools where the weary traveler can take a dip into its fresh, clear and cool waters.

Perhaps the only pure-brick building the Mountain Province is found in this border barrio. This is the Balbalasang Elementary School building, erected some 30 years ago. The bricks used in putting up the school were baked from crude implements by the early pupils as well as the parents of the schoolchildren. Today, this school building stands as one of the historical landmarks of the Mountain Province – a living symbol of civilization in this part of the country and a living tribute to the dedication of early settlers of this barrio to their dreams of enlightening their sons and daughters through the blessings of education.

This is Balbalan – the land of cascading waterfalls and a promising timber as well as mining municipality.

Hunting any species of deer starts from January to May 15 every year. This was embodied in the parks and wildlife regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
According to the regulations, a licensed hunter could hunt any species of deer during the season. The law, however, prohibits the hunting of female deer any time of the year. Two male deer are the catch limit (bag limit) allowed by law for any licensed hunter. Wild carabao could also be hunted during the same season but the bag limit is limited to only one male of this animal.

Sports hunters could get their permit from the Parks and Wildlife Office at Binondo, Manila.

Balbalan: Land of Waterfalls

by Augustus Ulat Saboy, ca. 1966

[Note: Although commercialism has, in the past few decades, crept into the hinterlands of Balbalan and has scarred their pristine beauty in many areas, the municipality remains alluring. Several waterfalls still cascade down mountainsides to join the great Saltan River and the underground river Gus Saboy speaks of still rumbles below a section of the rugged roads of Balbalan. Deer and wild boars, however, are now on the brink of extinction. - sms]

BALBALAN – A wanderlust may find himself fully satiated with historic sights and scenic wonders in this municipality if he makes it a point to visit all the natural wonders of this western Kalinga municipality.

Of course, he must be physically fit, first of all – with a strong back to meet the bumps of a buggy ride through Balbalan’s rugged road and a good pair of legs to climb hillsides into the barrios and sitios, criss-crossed by horse and foot trails.

From the municipality of Lubuagan, the capital town of the sub-province of Kalinga, one is greeted by the sight of Limo-falls, a 60-foot waterfall in the sitio of Salagpat, Balinciagao. This is the second known highest waterfall in this municipality, and perhaps in the province. It cascades down a high cliff overlooking the Pasil River below and the villages of Balinciagao barrio.

Along the road up to the old municipality center of this municipality bearing its name are other waterfalls gliding down thickly wooded hillsides. As one travels westward through the barrio of Balbalan, he finds himself swallowed by thick forests through which the Kalinga-Abra national highway is carved out from the rocky mountainsides. Here in this jungle section of the road is found a natural tunnel formed by a huge rock whose caves rest on another big rock, thus forming a short tunnel.

Beyond this tunnel and towards the barrio of Salegseg, the present municipal center of the Balbalan is the famous Ugid underground river. A short stopover on this spot gives a traveler an opportunity to hear the droning sound of the river below, as if a propeller-driven airplane is left with engines running. It is said that this subterranean river is teeming with black fresh water eels of varying sizes. Thomas Awing, a public school teacher and among the few natives of the place who have toured this underground river, said that during the dry months of the year, natives of the place visit the river by passing through big rock cleavages on the surface near the road. In some sections of the river, torches are needed because of the darkness. It is in these sections of the underground river that fresh water eels are found, Awing says.

The public school teacher also reveled that in his own barrio of Poswoy, which is some two-hour hike from the national road, another breath-taking sight can be had from what is believed as the highest waterfall in Kalinga – the Ligayan falls. During rainy seasons, the waterfall sends down a giant silver veil of water from the mountain above. As the falling water hits the Saltan River hundreds of feet below, it sends sprays of water formed like huge flower petals. Other waterfalls, according to Awing in Dao-angan and Poswoy – all in this municipality – are Pudao and Maulilog falls which he said are equally “beautiful” in sights.

Salegseg, the site of the municipal hall, has also its contribution to scenic wonders in this region in the form of the Makelkelang mountains whose huge rock face appears like the world-famed Rock of Gibraltar in Span along the Morrocco Strait. Legends have it that Kabunian, the legendary Kalinga superbeing, once roamed this mountain. White stripes formed on the face of a rock below the mountain is said to be the stains” of the “vomit of Kabunian” when he was food-poisoned by the old villagers of the place.

Westward towards the Abra-Kalinga provincial boundary, the barrio of Pantikian greets you with another huge waterfall called the Giso-od falls. The falls which is hemmed in my perpendicular cliffs on its sides is famous for its legend as “suicide-fall” for spurned lovers. Other waterfalls seen along the road now under construction leading to the province of Abra on the west are the Bagawat falls and the Agta falls, the latter yielding a romantic sight with its “gold” water apparently caused by the rusty color of the rock through which the water flows.

In the westernmost barrio of Balbalasang, more waterfalls greet the sightseer. The Mapatag falls near the barrio may be likened to the “Bridal Veil” falls of Kennon road in the municipality of Tuba. Within the barrio is the Toy-ob falls around which are found natural swimming pools where the weary traveler can take a dip into its fresh, clear and cool waters.

Perhaps the only pure-brick building the Mountain Province is found in this border barrio. This is the Balbalasang Elementary School building, erected some 30 years ago. The bricks used in putting up the school were baked from crude implements by the early pupils as well as the parents of the schoolchildren. Today, this school building stands as one of the historical landmarks of the Mountain Province – a living symbol of civilization in this part of the country and a living tribute to the dedication of early settlers of this barrio to their dreams of enlightening their sons and daughters through the blessings of education.

This is Balbalan – the land of cascading waterfalls and a promising timber as well as mining municipality.

Hunting any species of deer starts from January to May 15 every year. This was embodied in the parks and wildlife regulations promulgated by the Secretary of Agriculture and Natural Resources.
According to the regulations, a licensed hunter could hunt any species of deer during the season. The law, however, prohibits the hunting of female deer any time of the year. Two male deer are the catch limit (bag limit) allowed by law for any licensed hunter. Wild carabao could also be hunted during the same season but the bag limit is limited to only one male of this animal.

Sports hunters could get their permit from the Parks and Wildlife Office at Binondo, Manila.

Re: Chinese Songs

For those of you who share Ching Kilakil's interest in Chinese songs, let me recommend http://www.chinese-tools.com/. The texts include pinyin (Romanized form) and hanzi (characters), as well as word-for-word English translations. "Laoshu Ai Dami" (Mouse Loves Big Rice), "Tong Hua" (Fairy Tale), "Amani" (Peace), and several other popular Mandarin/Cantonese songs can be downloaded in MP3 format or viewed via embedded YouTube videos. The site can be a great resource for those who wish to either study Chinese culture or polish their Mandarin Chinese.


Related websites: http://www.learn-chinese-through-music.com/. Bryan Todd also offers effective tips on learning Mandarin and other languages @ http://www.thelanguageexpert.com.


Here's one of my favorite Mandarin pop songs, "Lao Shu Ai Da Mi" by Yang Chen Gang (the song has 16 versions - see transliteration here):








- 斯考特 (Sī kǎo té) :>

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

We Think So Because...


We think so because other people all think so; or because after all, we do think so; or because we were told so, and think we must think so; or because we once thought so, and think we still think so; or because, having thought so, we think we will think so.



- Henry Sidgwick, quoted in Larry A. Samovar & Richard E. Porter, Communication Between Cultures (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Company, 1995), 79.

Monday, May 26, 2008

Get Ready North America, da KING is Coming!

Nope, Fernando Poe, Jr., the lamented "King of Philippine Movies," has not resurrected yet. But this one's also a Filipino. And he's more than a movie king: he's the Appointed Son of God through whom "The Almighty Father, the Creator of all... is calling His children into the Ark of their Salvation" (i.e. The Kingdom of Jesus Christ The Name Above Every Name).


His eyes are now set on Canada and the US where he is expected to land these next two months - 01 June in Vanowen, Van Nuys, CA; 15 June in East Elmhurst, New York; 29 June in Waipahu, Hawaii; and 06 July in Surrey, British Columbia.


He is Pastor Apollo C. Quibolloy, now globe-trotting and triumphantly saying:




"Marami pa ang papasok sa Kaharian at magiging mga anak ng Ama. Ako ang daan patungo sa Ama at wala nang ibang daan maliban sa Kanyang Hinirang na Anak." (Many more will enter the Kingdom to become the children of the Father. I am the way to the Father and there is no other way but through His Appointed Son.)



For Quibolloy's claims, Arsenio Ferriol -- the "Apostle for the Last Days" -- must be fuming mad by now, and Felix Ysagun Manalo -- the "Last Messenger for the Last Days" -- must be turning in his grave.


While their respective saints go marching in...


So America, get ready to tremble...!!!


- Source: Apollo C. Quibolloy, "Ang Doktrina ng Pagbabago," Pinas: The Filipino's Global Newspaper, 26 May-01 June 2008, p. 8; see ad on p. 9.


Related post: "The Language of Exclusivism"



I Just Won 500,000 Pounds!

The scammers you always have with you...:>



FROM THE DESK OF IAN WILLIAM,


THE ZONAL COORDINATOR,


INTERNATIONAL PROMOTIONS/PRIZE AWARD DEPARTMENT,


CITY LOTTO,


UNITED KINGDOM.



Ref: CLUK/475061725



Batch: 7056490902/188

We happily announce to you the draw of the City Lotto International program held in London. Your e-mail address attached to Serial number 7917/06 won you a total sum of £500,000.00 GBP (Five Hundred Thousand pounds) in cash credited to file C/7450118308/89, From the total cash prize shared amongst eight lucky winners in this category.

All participants were selected through a computer ballot draw system drawn from Nine hundred thousand E-mail addresses from Canada, Australia, United States, Asia, Europe, Middle East, Africa and Oceania as part of our international promotions program which is conducted annually.

CLAIMS PROCEDURES:




To begin your claims therefore, you are advised as a matter of urgency, to contact the under listed licensed and accredited claims Director for the processing of your prize award winning.

Claims Director: Mr. David Newton
Email: citylottoclaims1@yahoo.com.hk


Phone: +44 704 574 2658


+44 704 573 8158



Congratulations once more from all members and staffs of this program.



NB: PLEASE SEE THAT YOU QUOTE YOUR REF AND BATCH NUMBERS IN YOUR CORRESPONDENCE TO YOUR CLAIMS AGENT.



Yours Faithfully,


Mr. Ian William.


AFRO-ASIAN Zonal Coordinator.


City Lotto International.

Sunday, May 25, 2008

GSP Charter Signed

26 May 1940. President Manuel L. Quezon inks the Girl Scouts of the Philippines (GSP) charter under Commonwealth Act No. 542. Josefa Llanes Escoda or "Pepang" -- acclaimed as "Florence Nightingale of the Philippines" -- set her mark on the pages of Philippine history as the GSP's first national executive. More about this famous Ilocana women's rights activist in Dominador Javellana III's, Bolomen: Stories of the Civilian Resistance in Wartime Ilocos (Manila: InterFormat AV Manila, 2003), 87-93.




The Scopes Monkey Trial

25 May 1925. Upon the testimony of seven students, high school teacher John T. Scopes is indicted thus opening the curtain for the theatrical "Trial of the Century" popularly known as the "Scopes Monkey Trial" held in the formerly obscure mining town of Dayton, Tennessee. The case was calculated to test the Butler Act of 21 March 1925 which barred the teaching of the Theory of Evolution in Tennessee. The 12-day trial (10-21 July 1925) matched Democratic presidential wannabe and Fundamentalist preacher William Jennings Bryan against ACLU lawyer and confessed agnostic Clarence Darrow in a celebrated polemical combat. Substantial details of the case can be found online @ the UMKC website. A review of the movie, "Inherit the Wind" -- a fictionalized version of the trial -- can be read @ John Clayton's site. (see also article by Robert Harsh).


For an objective treatment of the Trial and the Creation-Evolution controversy, I recommend the following:


Giberson, Karl W. and Donald A. Yerxa. Species of Origins: America's Search for a Creation Story. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc., 2002.


Larson, Edward J. Summer for the Gods: The Scopes Trial and America's Continuing Debate Over Science and Religion. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1997.


"We are Culture"


Culture is the medium evolved by humans to survive.  Nothing in our lives is free from cultural influences. It is the keystone in civilization's arch and is the medium through which all of life events must flow.  We are culture.



- Edward T. Hall, quoted in Larry A. Samovar & Richard E. Porter, Communication Between Cultures (Belmont, CA: Wadsworth Publishing Co., 1995), 44.

Saturday, May 24, 2008

Ji Ho & Korean Politics

I had no idea there was something more to Ji Ho's mind than the frivolity of a Korean rich kid I often catch dozing off in my 9am class. Surely, this sleephyhead can't be interested in something as serious as politics, I thought.


But I was wrong. I misjudged this boy who, in one of our discussions in my World History class, turned out to be well-informed about South Korean politics. Consulting his electronic dictionary from time to time, he struggled to put in his two cents on what is wrong about their incumbent President Lee Myung-bak and his government.


Ji Ho said he wanted Lee Myung-bak impeached for now reneging on his promise early into his Presidency to keep his people from the havoc of Mad Cow Disease by not allowing the importation of meat from 30 months old cows. Lee's term, he added, saw the outrageous rise of hourly internet rates from 1,000 Won ( PhP 40) to 12,500 Won (PhP 500). He also could not accept that Lee "cheapened" himself by driving a golf car with George Bush as his passenger in his visit to Camp David, and bowing to Emperor Akihito in his recent visit to Japan.


Finally, this rangy highschooler told me of an ancient prophecy which warned Koreans that the moment one of the four gates of Seoul Korea is razed to the ground, the Korean nation will start to disintegrate. Now, he explained, it so happened that Lee's rise to power coincided with the burning of Seoul's 600-year old gate or Namdaemun ("Great South Gate") by a presumably deranged fellow. Ergo, Lee is the prophesied jinx.


Well, I could have shared with him my take on all of these issues but I decided to keep mum about it for I was just so elated to realize that it was unfair for me to have automatically equated his drowsiness in my class to apathy towards the larger issues of life.


I still hope he diligently reads his textbooks though.:>

Re: Call Centers and Racism

Below is an insightful reaction to my article "Call Centers and Racism" by manang Mary Ann Foy-os Apopot, a nurse who has been working in the US for over a decade now. Over the last two months or so, I have been corresponding with her and her husband, manong Martin, after they stumbled upon my blogsite last March. I and my family had the privilege of meeting manang Mary Ann in person when she visited Baguio early this month.


What she has to say surely helps us understand the issue of racism and ethnocentrism from her side of the world. Having been briefly one of those fidgety, sweaty, and stammering Level 1 Customer Service Representatives (CSR), I realize now -- especially when I have had to be put on hold several times and for a long time by a CSR when calling for intermittent connection and other issues with my broadband connection -- how calling Technical Support can be such a pain in the neck. And a pain in the ear, I might add, for sometimes having to bear Beethoven's "Symphony No. 3 in E-flat Major" being played over and over again for 10 minutes or more.


I have always tried to be civil to the responding CSR, though, even after a long wait. For I'd keep reminding myself that the guy at the other end of the line might be just like what I was when I first took on calls on the floor -- too scared to even press the inbound call button of my Avaya, too rattled to mind my pronunciation and grammar, too confused to follow the simplest instructions and screenshots in my BOSS or other similar troubleshooting tools.


Ok, let me now release you from my ramblings. Here's manang Mary Ann (email posted with permission):





Reading the article on Call Centers and Racism amuses me.


Having been an IRATE customer myself several times, I didn't realize that I could be one of the so-called racists. Let me also share my side as an IRATE customer, if you will.


I've had to call 1-800 several times for problems with my computer/internet connection, credit card, etc. Nine out of ten of the time, I get a customer service representative (CSR) who is either Indian, Filipino, Hispanic or some other nationality. When you tell what your problem is , you are either put on hold for a LONG time or passed to different people before you get the right person to answer your question or troubleshoot your issue. Or you are asked MANY times to repeat what you SAID because they can not understand you well or the caller doesn't understand the customer representative.


Now that is VERY IRRITATING, much more than the very reason you called them in the first place. So at times, I coudn't help appearing rude. I am a Filipino too and yet i get irritated maybe because I am IMPATIENT ( because I don't have the luxury of time to spend waiting) or I feel that the customer representative is INCOMPETENT & is wasting my time.


Don't get me wrong. I am not a jerk, asshole or a bitch!:>


Actually, when I call 1-800 and a Filipino happens to answer the phone, I am the first one to say "KUMUSTA" to let them know that I am Filipina too. If I am satisfied with the service I get, I compliment her/him sincerely for the job well done. If I am not satisfied with the service I get, I gently give suggestions on how she/he can improve his/her customer service.


I think one reason why CSRs get irate American callers is that some Americans are upset that a lot of businesses and jobs have gone to China, India, Philippines, Mexico & other countries where labor is cheaper and overhead expenses for the company are lesser. This, of course, resulted in a lot of Americans losing their jobs. Creating more jobs that are lost to the Third World has always been an issue during Presidential campaigns here.


Some other Americans complain against the invasion by Third World countries of American technology,industry and workforce. Most of the commodities we buy here in America are made from other countries. Seldom do you see commodities being "Made in the U.S." Most of our electronics are from China and Japan, and most of our clothings are either made in China, Philippines, Malaysia, Mexico, or ther countries. When I share these realities to some American colleagues and friends, they are not happy about it.


I remember that one time when I was working in a hospital one doctor, noting all five of us Filipinos in the nurses' station, jokingly said, : "What is this -- a Filipino invasion?" I gamely replied, "Invasion indeed! Why, you are from Holland, we are from the Philippines, and we are the majority!" By the way, our secretary was Hispanic.



I agree with you that we cannot generalize Americans as condescending. I guess I can be very condescending too if I don't get a quality service that I deserve regardless of the CSR's race.


I am so glad that in my more than 15 years of working here in the U.S. as a nurse, I have not experienced becoming a victim of racism. I had always been treated as equal regardless of my skin color. I do also attribute it to my being assertive and able to speak English fluently (thanks to my academic upbringing in the Cordilleras) as well as my being a highly competent nurse.



My patients and colleagues admire my skin's natural tan, it being considered as "the perfect skin color." While many -- if not most -- filipinos are not proud of their brown skin, White people here go sun tanning at the beach or in their backyard.


Regarding the American who said that "Filipinos think of nothing but money and how they can take advantage of him," I think he probably based it on his personal experience with some Filipinos. I have had some Americans married to Filipino who relate to me their horrible experiences with their Filipino wives and relatives. Some of their laments were: " My wife's relatives think I am an ATM spitting money for them; "These Filipinos see you as if you are a walking money"; "My wife and her relatives are very opportunistic"; "My wife's relatives call or write ONLY when they need money but do not call or write to say 'Thank you.'"


On the other hand, there are also Americans that sing PRAISES about their Filipino spouses and relatives...


It is also VERY TRUE that we Asians can be more impatient and racist than some Americans. I realized this when I visited my relatives in Singapore. Whew! Talk about being IMPATIENT... Talk about every Singaporean demanding TOP QUALITY SERVICE. I felt racism in Singapore in just 48 hours of staying there, while I had not experienced racism in all my more than 15 years in the U.S.


Ethnocentrism/Regionalism is so far the one that I still encounter now and then even here in the U.S. I am so proud to be an Igorot. I had my first exposure of prejudice against Igorots when I went to college in Baguio City. Every time some acquaintances make nasty comments about Igorots (i.e., head hunters, have tails, filthy, poor, uncivilized, uneducated, etc.), I tell them I am an Igorot, and then ask them if I fit any of their descriptions. I then take the pleasure of seeing their faces and ears turn red with embarrassment. I also took those incidents as an opportunity to educate them about what Igorot really means. Until now, I encounter this "kissing cousin" of racism among fellow filipinos in the U.S. who, more often than not, would not easily believe me when I tell them I am a PURE IGOROT.


Last but not least, you can not experience racial discrimination without your permission or consent. How? As you mentioned in your articleI by "being the BEST [you] can be in whatever (legitimate) career or profession [you] have chosen". I personally can attest to this. I had been treated an equal by my colleagues and also gained respect from my superiors, colleagues and clients by being the BEST person I can be, being assertive, and being an EXCELLENT, COMPETENT, and EFFICIENT nurse.


I had witnessed other foreign nurses who were hollered and cussed at by patients, doctors and superiors. Some were fired or treated unjustly by superiors, colleagues and others. I have observed that some of the common traits they share are the following: they are not as competent as they should be, they are not assertive, and they are not fluent in English and thus are unable to quickly retort to defend themselves...


Sean Jang: Another Fine Korean Student

On the first birthday of their child, Korean parents make the baby sit on a table and, together with their relatives, cheer on the child to pick up one or two items lining the space before her/him. Traditionally, these items had consisted of a pencil/notebook, paper money, a piece of thread, and a grain of rice -- each representing wisdom or intelligence, wealth, long life, and health, respectively. Nowadays, however, it has become fashionable for Korean parents to include a toy laptop ( (symbolizing business acumen), a ball (symbolizing sportsmanship), and what not. Whichever item the child chooses, my Korean students/friends assure me, can hint at the child's future career.


My friend Chris Kim tells me that her nine-year old boy Sean chose a pencil that day. It meant, of course, that Sean would be a smart student or, later, a fine scholar. The way things are with this boy's academic performance, I could sense that his first birthday ritual was quite prophetic.


Now in Grade 4 and in his third year of schooling in Baguio City, Sean's ESL competence is better than that of the high school Korean students I currently teach. One of his classmates at Small World Christian School once asked after Sean again posted perfect scores in their English and Math tests, "Don't you ever make mistakes, Sean?"


Having already noted his superior intelligence coupled with his admirable diligence in his studies (not to mention his kind and well-off parents' all-out support), it didn't come as a surprise to me to learn that he has consistently belonged to the best of the best in school.


Teaching a student like Sean surely makes a tutor's job very fulfilling. It adds greater value to one's teaching profession other than earning one's keep. This is especially true to an ESL tutor who has had frustrating experiences with intelligent and rich but lazy Korean kids who'd rather eat Yellow Cab pizza in bed than attend an English class. Or who'd rather steal away for a smoke as to sound off about a lesson in class.


That is why I don't mind taking two jeepney rides each day to Sean's place to tutor him and his dad, James Jang, just after my half-day classes at a regular Korean school.


I have great hopes for this boy -- as great as my wish that all these materially blessed Korean kids across the country will do justice to their parents' sacrifices by conscientiously pursuing what they really came here for.


Or else, their parents should be asked to donate their money to our public schools thereby putting their hard-earned Won to better use. :>


Wisdom from Africa: On Women & Suffering

(Uchendu to Okonkwo)




...why is it that one of the commonest names we give our children is Nneka, or 'Mother is Supreme?' We all know that a man is the head of the family and his wives do his bidding. A child belongs to its father and his family and not to its mother and her family. A man belongs to his fatherland and not to his motherland. And yet we say Nneka -- 'Mother is Supreme?' Why is that?....


Why is it that when a woman dies she is taken home to be buried with her own kinsmen? She is not buried with her husband's kinsmen....


It's true that a child belongs to his father. But when a father beats his child, it seeks sympathy in its mother's hut. A man belongs to his fatherland when things are good and life is sweet. But when there is sorrow and bitterness he finds refuge in his motherland.


You think you are the greatest sufferer in the world? Do you know that men are sometimes banished for life? Do you know that men sometimes lose all their yams and even their children? I had six wives once. I have none now except that young girl who knows not her right from her left. Do you know how many children I have buried -- children I begot in my youth and strength? Twenty-two. I did not hang myself, and I am still alive. If you think you are the greatest sufferer in the world ask my daughter, Akueni, how many twins she has borne and thrown away. Have you not heard the song they sing when a woman dies?


'For whom is it well, for whom is it well?


There is no one for whom it is well.'



- Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart (New York: Anchor Books, 1994), 133-135.

Friday, May 23, 2008

Girolamo Savonarola

23 May 1498. Florentian Reformer Girolamo Savonarola is hanged and burned after being tortured on the rack, upon the orders of Pope Alexander VI. Know more about Savonarola @ historyguide & newadvent.

Microsoft Lottery Award (hohoho)

The world does not lack sufferers as sure as it does not lack scammers...:>

MICROSOFT LOTTERY AWARD TEAM
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Winner No: 5



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Our Esteemed Past Winners:




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Read "How to Recognize a Scam"; more at hoaxslayer

Thursday, May 22, 2008

New Cordi Website

http://cordillerans.com/ seeks to be an "online rendezvous place for Igorots all over the world." I'm sure this site will prove to be a great resource about anything Cordilleran!

Myanmar & China Tragedies

Dale Carnegie noted this truth in his bestseller, How to Win Friends and Influence People: "A person's toothache means more to that person than a famine in China which kills a million people. A boil on one's neck interests one more than forty earthquakes in Africa."*


It may be hard to accept it, but Carnegie's observation applies to many of us today. Even in the face of the horror wrought about by the utterly devastating cyclone in Myanmar and earthquake in in Central China, many of us continue to complain about the many things that we lack in life and thus fail to fully appreciate what we got, or get too focused on our other personal problems and on our petty strifes with others that we sometimes fail to sympathize with those whose woes are far greater than ours.


Sometimes we find it better just to ignore tragedies like these, not wishing to compound our daily woes. Or perhaps, we realize that thinking about the suffering of tens of thousands of people out there can just remind us of our own helplessness.


Given these thoughts, we greatly admire then the individuals and groups who have gone to these tragedy-swept and shaken places to care for the victims. One of these individuals is Luis "Chito" Cusi of Cebu, who is now in Myanmar leading a team from the Philippine-based parachurch group called "MARCH for Christ" in a relief work. There are other Christian groups like Christian Aid and Partners in Progress who have been serving the people of Myanmar and China together with the UN and other international humanitarian groups. May all those involved in the rescue and relief operations in China, Myanmar and other places downed by the fierce blows of calamities continue to be blessed a thousandfold!


There are atheistic groups who quickly raise "Where is God?!" whenever these and other unfortunate events occur. It is easy for skeptics to blame God in times like these and forget the human factors involved. Theodicy -- a justification of God's ways -- is a tough subject, but there have been thoughtful people who have done their best in helping the rest of us understand the ways by which to approach the big question.


In this light, let me recommend the resources cited below to our readers.It is true that no one has the last say on the Problem of Pain, but as for me these writers can at least offer us some enlightening vantage points from which to see this perplexing issue. I continue to be blessed in my reading and re-reading of these articles and books. I hope these will bless your life too...:>


Internet: John C. Clayton - www.doesgodexist.org; http://www.whypain.org/


Books


Burke, Brad. Is God Obsolete? Colorado Springs: Victor, 2006.


Meister, Chad V. Building Belief: Constructing Faith from the Ground Up. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2006.


Sproul, R.C. The Invisible Hand: Do All Things Really Work for Good? Dallas, TX: Word Publishing, 1997.


Strobel, Lee. The Case for a Creator: A Journalist Investigates Scientific Evidence that Points Toward God. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2004.


Strobel, Lee. The Case for Faith: A Journalist Investigates the Toughest Objections to Christianity. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2000.



Tracy, Thomas F., ed. The God Who Acts: Philosophical and Theological Explorations. University Park, PA: The Pennsylvania State University, 1994.


Yancey, Philip. Disappointment with God: Three Questions No One Asks Aloud. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 1988.



*Dale Carnegie, How to Win Friends and Influence People (New York: Pocket Books, 1981), 93.


Wednesday, May 21, 2008

A (Pine) Tree

This "International Day for Biological Diversity," I'd like to pay tribute (:>) to that concrete pine tree at the top of Session Road in Baguio City which was built in place of the real one over a decade ago (see Vincent Cabreza's article on this @ Inquirer.net; for a couple of photos and some comments, go to phototecture).


A (Pine) Tree


(with profuse apologies to Alfred Joyce Kilmer and/or his descendants)


I think that I shall never see


A poem as concrete as a tree.


A tree whose mangled mouth is set


Against iron bars and cement;


A tree that can't see God all day,


And too petrified to pray;


A tree that may in summer wear


A nest of soot and smog in her plastic hair;


Upon whose bosom Christmas lights lay;


Who can't be intimate with rain.


Poems are made by fools like me,


But only politicians make concrete trees.


-smsaboy, 05.08